Crazy Monkey Creates

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New Pathways for Sock Knitters (book one) September 19, 2007

Filed under: 2007,quirky christy,sock — crazymonkeycreates @ 10:10 pm

This is not so much a review as a freak-out. I had a bad week. Already. So after hearing the raving sock knitting community (and the gals at knitgroup), I went out and bought Cat Bordhi’s book. And I think, yes, she’s a clever person, but … it all looks like flap and gusset construction. Now, I’m probably one of the few knitters who doesn’t like the flap and gusset, especially for the reason I’m about to state.

The stitches just “look wrong”. They’re 90 degrees from each other, and it’s a jarring look. The gusset kindasorta feathers the 90 degree look, but not to the extent that makes it look less like these stitches are in a car-crash with those stitches.  The short-row heel makes a smoother-looking transition to my eye between the instep and the ankle parts of the sock.

I’m going to try it, though. I’m going to try the little sock versions of the big socks, and I’ve been poring over the book trying to find the least jarring of transitions — I think it’s in the “Riverbed Architecture” socks for the most part, and the “Cedar Architecture” socks for the lesser part. Both of them ‘hide’ the gusset and flap somewhat.

I know three different short-row heels, and zero flappy-gussety things. I don’t know how to make the flaps look less flappy; I’m assuming a stockinette flap will look less… flappy than a slipped stitch or ribbed flap, but I don’t know. I’ll have to knit up some little ones to see, I guess.

What’s weird is I like entrelac, and it’s all 90-degrees knitting. It’s just the flap-and-gusset thing that bothers me. Is there anyone else like that? Am I alone in my non-flap non-gusseting? A quick google says I’m at least mostly alone in it. Most of the hits I saw were “don’t like” short rows, but love “flap and gusset”. Do you think it’s because of store-bought socks that I like short rows? The short-row heels fit me, I know that. They fit my feet, they fit Ben’s feet, and they just look “right”, like a well-thought-out bust dart in a shirt, or like shaping that’s hidden by cables, or the raglan increases/decreases in that pretty little line on either side of the neckline.

Maybe I’m just plain weird. I’ve thought of that possibility. It’s quite possible, and rather probable. Strange things bother me, like the flap and gusset. This is just the first thing that I’ve paid money for a whole book of. 😀

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4 Responses to “New Pathways for Sock Knitters (book one)”

  1. Laurie Says:

    Ya know, I never thought about it that way. I just DID socks how they’re supposed to be done. And then…then…toe-ups came into my life. And the short rows. After doing the socks using the Universal Toe Up Knitty method, I really enjoyed the process a lot more.

    Haven’t seen the book but it doesn’t sound like I’m going to be buying it.

    Sorry your week has been so bad. Hope the weekend makes it all better.

    And…nothing wrong with being just plain weird!

  2. Re: your question about what I was going to do to the sample socks from NPFSK- well, you have obviously put more thought into this than I have altho’ now that you have forced me to think about it I think that you are right, just knit the basic sock shape with no frills or decorations. You have a nice blog and I look forward to seeing how your samples are coming.

  3. alwen Says:

    I never thought of it that way, but I love short-row heels and find them easy, and the only flap & gusset sock I’ve ever knitted is a little tiny mini blue sock on 5-0 needles.

  4. MJ Says:

    I am all about the short row toes and heels as well. The flap and gusset thing just does not fit me and was very frustrating for me to knit since I was trying to modify it to fit. it just did not happen no matter how many times I tried. Glad I found the short row 🙂 You are not alone!


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